Using Experience Maps and Journey Maps

What is the difference between a customer experience map and a customer journey map? And what benefit does each bring in delivering quality and value driving customer experiences.

It’s worth saying, up front, that there is no set way of creating and using experience and journey maps. I am merely putting forward a method that I have used, with success, in the past! I believe it is useful to try and codify methodologies, especially in emerging areas, if for no other reason that to spark debate and discussion, so that improvement may be the result!

 

Experience Maps versus Journey Maps

Experience Map: What is it?
A representation of a person’s psychological process across the end to end journey of a significant event (e.g. annual holiday, buying a car). It starts from the trigger of the journey to the very end point of the experience.

Experience Map: What does it tell us?
The drivers of customer behaviour. What a person is thinking, doing and feeling; their frustrations; their needs and wants, and the goals that they are trying to achieve.

Experience Map: How can it be used?
To give a truly customer centric view of the service/experience/product that a business provides; but not limited to just the interactions with the service/experience/product – all influencing factors are included.

This allows for the identification of pain points and opportunities, and allows solutions to be crafted for these. These solutions enhance a customer’s experience and drives value into a business (via increased sales, customer satisfaction and loyalty and opportunities to reduce waste and cost).


Journey Map: What is it?
A representation of the ideal interactions that a person has with a product/service/experience, across the end to end journey. What channel and/or platform they interact with and what they are trying to accomplish during that interaction.

It can represent the current, as is, journeys; as well as the ideal, to be, journey. The former is an input into experience mapping (as well as giving a clear steer on where to fix pain points in the current journey), the latter is an actionable artefact.

Journey Map: What does it tell us?
What a customer is trying to achieve at each interaction, what goal they are trying to fulfil and what a business needs to do to help them to achieve this. It also gives a clear understanding of the transition between channels, and provides insight on what a customer needs to best move seamlessly between channels.

Journey Map: How can it be used?
Identify and prioritise requirements/projects; identify KPIs for measuring the efficacy of projects across the customer journey. It can show success factors from a customer point of view, and these can be used as (customer centric) KPIs.

Most importantly it can be used to ensure that the handoff between channels is being facilitated in a seamless and easy way.


 

Experience Maps are a very customer centric view of a journey. They are somewhat agnostic of where an interaction or activity happens, and are more interested in why a person is doing what they are doing: what goal are they trying to achieve. While abstracted from the what, experience maps force us to concentrate on a person’s core needs: what is it that they really want?

Journey maps are less abstract and show us more how and what a person does. What are they doing and where are they doing it; importantly, what are they doing next and where are they doing it. They can be created on a per persona basis to get a very granular view of customer behaviour by channel.

 

A poster version of this post is available here:  https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1973254/Profile/experience_journey.mapping_Alex.Horstmann.pdf

 

 

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The effect of delivering poor quality experiences

How does this manifest itself internally?

“The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten…”  

As I reflect more on this quote it strikes me as being equally true for both those on the receiving end of an experience, as it is for those delivering poor quality experiences. 

The double edge sword that is the MVP (minimal viable product) often leads to sub-standard, low quality experiences being released. This can often be down to the perceived subjectivity of what viable is, and also the decision being made from a technology and cost standpoint – rather than the integrity of the experience. 

Long term this comes back to bite an organisation. Benefits unrealised, too many bugs (blowing the total cost of ownership higher), rework required, introducing instability into the technology platform etc. It reduces trust in the delivery teams from stakeholders, and indeed those working to deliver these experiences feel short changed; demotivated for being unable to deliver anything of quality. 

Delivering poor experiences is not good for customers and not good for the business – we need to concentrate on delivering a quality baseline experience, and then, and only then, do we have permission to start to think about “surprise & delight” or introducing “value adding” features. 

  

We’re hiring: Researchers, EA/UXers, Designers & Developers!

The Customer Experience Team is a 27-strong multi disciplinary team covering Research, Service Design, UX, Design and front-end development. We believe that through what we do we can craft beautiful experiences that make our customers’ lives better. We are passionate about doing the best job possible, and we are committed to having fun doing it!

We embrace new challenges and solve problems; we believe in looking backwards only to help us take the right path forwards.

We question, critique and grow; we share, discuss and learn; we are creative and we wonder…

The team here has been given an expanded remit, covering not just General Merchandise (Tesco Direct), but also Clothing (F&F) and some other very exciting customer propositions, both online and covering our in-store digital kiosks – so we’re looking for great talent to join the exceptional team!

Researcher: 

http://www.tesco.com/directuiassets/SiteAssets/NonSeasonal/en_GB/pdf/Researcher.pdf

Experience Architect / UXer:

http://www.tesco.com/directuiassets/SiteAssets/NonSeasonal/en_GB/pdf/Experience%20Architect.pdf

Digital Designer:

http://www.tesco.com/directuiassets/SiteAssets/NonSeasonal/en_GB/pdf/UX%20(Digital)%20Designer.pdf

Front End Developers:

Prototyping/Innovation: http://www.tesco.com/directuiassets/SiteAssets/NonSeasonal/en_GB/pdf/UI%20Developer%20(Prototyper).pdf

Split Testing & Optimisation: http://www.tesco.com/directuiassets/SiteAssets/NonSeasonal/en_GB/pdf/UI%20Developer%20(TestandTarget).pdf

Platform Development: http://www.tesco.com/directuiassets/SiteAssets/NonSeasonal/en_GB/pdf/UI%20Developer%20(Platform).pdf

 

Apply now:
www.tesco-careers.com

 

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