Using Experience Maps and Journey Maps

What is the difference between a customer experience map and a customer journey map? And what benefit does each bring in delivering quality and value driving customer experiences.

It’s worth saying, up front, that there is no set way of creating and using experience and journey maps. I am merely putting forward a method that I have used, with success, in the past! I believe it is useful to try and codify methodologies, especially in emerging areas, if for no other reason that to spark debate and discussion, so that improvement may be the result!

 

Experience Maps versus Journey Maps

Experience Map: What is it?
A representation of a person’s psychological process across the end to end journey of a significant event (e.g. annual holiday, buying a car). It starts from the trigger of the journey to the very end point of the experience.

Experience Map: What does it tell us?
The drivers of customer behaviour. What a person is thinking, doing and feeling; their frustrations; their needs and wants, and the goals that they are trying to achieve.

Experience Map: How can it be used?
To give a truly customer centric view of the service/experience/product that a business provides; but not limited to just the interactions with the service/experience/product – all influencing factors are included.

This allows for the identification of pain points and opportunities, and allows solutions to be crafted for these. These solutions enhance a customer’s experience and drives value into a business (via increased sales, customer satisfaction and loyalty and opportunities to reduce waste and cost).


Journey Map: What is it?
A representation of the ideal interactions that a person has with a product/service/experience, across the end to end journey. What channel and/or platform they interact with and what they are trying to accomplish during that interaction.

It can represent the current, as is, journeys; as well as the ideal, to be, journey. The former is an input into experience mapping (as well as giving a clear steer on where to fix pain points in the current journey), the latter is an actionable artefact.

Journey Map: What does it tell us?
What a customer is trying to achieve at each interaction, what goal they are trying to fulfil and what a business needs to do to help them to achieve this. It also gives a clear understanding of the transition between channels, and provides insight on what a customer needs to best move seamlessly between channels.

Journey Map: How can it be used?
Identify and prioritise requirements/projects; identify KPIs for measuring the efficacy of projects across the customer journey. It can show success factors from a customer point of view, and these can be used as (customer centric) KPIs.

Most importantly it can be used to ensure that the handoff between channels is being facilitated in a seamless and easy way.


 

Experience Maps are a very customer centric view of a journey. They are somewhat agnostic of where an interaction or activity happens, and are more interested in why a person is doing what they are doing: what goal are they trying to achieve. While abstracted from the what, experience maps force us to concentrate on a person’s core needs: what is it that they really want?

Journey maps are less abstract and show us more how and what a person does. What are they doing and where are they doing it; importantly, what are they doing next and where are they doing it. They can be created on a per persona basis to get a very granular view of customer behaviour by channel.

 

A poster version of this post is available here:  https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1973254/Profile/experience_journey.mapping_Alex.Horstmann.pdf

 

 

We’re hiring: Researchers, EA/UXers, Designers & Developers!

The Customer Experience Team is a 27-strong multi disciplinary team covering Research, Service Design, UX, Design and front-end development. We believe that through what we do we can craft beautiful experiences that make our customers’ lives better. We are passionate about doing the best job possible, and we are committed to having fun doing it!

We embrace new challenges and solve problems; we believe in looking backwards only to help us take the right path forwards.

We question, critique and grow; we share, discuss and learn; we are creative and we wonder…

The team here has been given an expanded remit, covering not just General Merchandise (Tesco Direct), but also Clothing (F&F) and some other very exciting customer propositions, both online and covering our in-store digital kiosks – so we’re looking for great talent to join the exceptional team!

Researcher: 

http://www.tesco.com/directuiassets/SiteAssets/NonSeasonal/en_GB/pdf/Researcher.pdf

Experience Architect / UXer:

http://www.tesco.com/directuiassets/SiteAssets/NonSeasonal/en_GB/pdf/Experience%20Architect.pdf

Digital Designer:

http://www.tesco.com/directuiassets/SiteAssets/NonSeasonal/en_GB/pdf/UX%20(Digital)%20Designer.pdf

Front End Developers:

Prototyping/Innovation: http://www.tesco.com/directuiassets/SiteAssets/NonSeasonal/en_GB/pdf/UI%20Developer%20(Prototyper).pdf

Split Testing & Optimisation: http://www.tesco.com/directuiassets/SiteAssets/NonSeasonal/en_GB/pdf/UI%20Developer%20(TestandTarget).pdf

Platform Development: http://www.tesco.com/directuiassets/SiteAssets/NonSeasonal/en_GB/pdf/UI%20Developer%20(Platform).pdf

 

Apply now:
www.tesco-careers.com

 

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CX Pyramid2B

Friday Link Round-Up – March 13 2015

The CX Pyramid: Why Most Customer Experience Efforts Fail
http://www.experiencetheblog.com/2015/03/the-cx-pyramid-why-most-customer.html

 
 

Bottling Lightning: How to channel and sustain creativity
http://uxmag.com/articles/bottling-lightning

 
 

Deconstructing Fidelity
http://uxmag.com/articles/deconstructing-fidelity

 
 

The man behind the Apple Watch
http://howtospendit.ft.com/technology/77791-the-man-behind-the-apple-watch

 
 

“Delightful” Interaction Design Needs To Die
http://www.fastcodesign.com/3042849/delightful-interaction-design-needs-to-die

 
 

The lowest price doesn’t mean the price is right
https://econsultancy.com/blog/66173-the-lowest-price-doesn-t-mean-the-price-is-right

 
 

Automating Style Guide-Driven Development
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2015/03/05/automating-style-guide-driven-development/

 
 

Nudging and Choice Architecture: Ethical Considerations
http://www.experientia.com/blog/nudging-and-choice-architecture-ethical-considerations/

 

 

Friday Funny: Kindle Cover Disasters
http://kindlecoverdisasters.tumblr.com/

Friday Link Round-Up – Feb 27

Infinite Scrolling: Let’s Get To The Bottom Of This

http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/05/03/infinite-scrolling-lets-get-to-the-bottom-of-this/

Why did infinite scroll fail at Etsy?

http://danwin.com/2013/01/infinite-scroll-fail-etsy/

Distractions in the lab

https://www.redweb.com/agency/blog/distractions-in-the-lab

Will ‘eye-tracking’ technology go mainstream in 2015?

http://m.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-31654177

10 ways to use colour to capture attention (via @JackRoles)

http://blogs.adobe.com/creativecloud/ten-ways-to-use-color-to-capture-attention-part-1/

http://blogs.adobe.com/creativecloud/ten-ways-to-use-color-to-capture-attention-part-2/

How to manufacture desire

http://uxmag.com/articles/how-to-manufacture-desire

The “I can’t believe he just did that” video of the week:

Man Castrates Reindeer With His Teeth

http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/earth-new-wild/150212-reindeer-castration