User Experience, Usability and Design links for April 9th

I bookmark a lot of pages and sites which I find interesting, inspirational and informative every day! I’d like to share some of them with you here. In general they are about user experience, usability, UCD, accessbility and design. In general, but not always!!

  • Scrolling and Attention
    Web users spend 80% of their time looking at information above the page fold. Although users do scroll, they allocate only 20% of their attention below the fold.
  • Measuring the User Experience
    A companion website to the book by Tom Tullis and Bill Albert.
  • Debunking the myths of online usability testing
    The motivation for this article is to help UX researchers keep an open mind about online usability testing. There are some researchers who have been using this approach for years and find it useful (in certain situations). Others are new to it, and wanting to learn more about its strength and limitations. Finally, some UX researchers have already formed an opinion about online usability testing, and deemed it not useful for a variety of (unfounded) reasons. I hope by exposing these myths, we (as a UX community) can evaluate this tool based on its actual merits.
  • Web Analytics
    Link round-up on Web Analytics.
  • Horizontal Attention Leans Left (Jakob Nielsen’s Alertbox)
    Web users spend 69% of their time viewing the left half of the page and 30% viewing the right half. A conventional layout is thus more likely to make sites profitable.
  • The Secret to Designing an Intuitive UX: Match the Mental Model to the Conceptual Model
    Imagine that you’ve never seen an iPad, but I’ve just handed one to you and told you that you can read books on it. Before you turn on the iPad, before you use it, you have a model in your head of what reading a book on the iPad will be like. You have assumptions about what the book will look like on the screen, what things you will be able to do, and how you will do them—things like turning a page, or using a bookmark. You have a “mental model” of reading a book on the iPad, even if you’ve never done it before.
  • The Web Credibility Project: Guidelines – Stanford University
    We have compiled 10 guidelines for building the credibility of a web site. These guidelines are based on three years of research that included over 4,500 people.

Please do feel free to suggest other related (and unrelated ones)!

About the Author

An experienced, commercial and creative user experience professional with a proven record in UX leadership, strategy, people management, branding and innovation. Responsible for the design and delivery of several high profile, big brand web sites and enterprise software applications. All opinions here are my own.

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